Killer who stabbed woman 15 times on Manor Street near E. 93rd still not caught

Mother skeptical that Cleveland police are investigating Jameela Hasan's murder and those of others who've been killed and remain unsolved

Jameela Hasan's vicious murder brought Cleveland to nearly 100 in 2012 and one of 30 that have not been solved.  Ward 2 Councilman Zack Reed and Hasan's mother believe Mayor Frank Jackson should follow Attorney General Mike DeWine's example and open the city's unsolved homicide investigations so the public can help find their killers.

Jameela “Snookie” Hasan’s vicious murder brought Cleveland to nearly 100 in 2012 and one of 30 that have not been solved. Ward 2 Councilman Zack Reed and Hasan’s mother believe Mayor Frank Jackson should follow Attorney General Mike DeWine’s example and open the city’s unsolved homicide investigation files so the public can help find their killers.

CLEVELAND, OH – Ayesha Hasan said if she had not seen Ward 2 Councilman Zachary Reed on television talking about her daughter Jameela “Snookie” Hasan’s December 17 murder she wouldn’t have known that any city official was concerned.

“I called.  He called back and I was surprised,” Hasan told Cleveland Challenger.  “To  know someone is looking into this gives me a sense of relief.”

Jameela Hasan’s body was discovered by the downstairs tenant of 9428 Manor Avenue on December 17, 2012.  News media reports say the 37-year-old woman was stabbed 11 times in the neck.  Medical examiner spokesman Powell Caesar said it was 15 times.

It wasn’t until Cleveland Challenger conducted a search for other homicides near East 93rd Street after Christine Malone and Jazmine Trotter’s bodies were found that attention was drawn to Hasan’s brutal murder.  While Evans and Trotter were murdered in a similar manner and found within two days of each other on March 22 and March 24, Hasan’s stabbing didn’t follow the pattern.

Nonetheless, three murders along a two mile stretch of East 93rd that touched three Cleveland wards was alarming enough for Reed to take to the streets with flyers and warn women to be careful, and residents to be on the lookout.  It was in Ward 2 that serial killer Anthony Sowell abducted and murdered 11 women.  Reed wasn’t taking any chances that another serial killer might be on the prowl.

Hasan said the little she knows about Jameela’s murder is that her daughter’s downstairs neighbor told detectives he hadn’t seen her for nearly five days and grew worried so he called their landlord.  The neighbor said the landlord wanted to stay connected to the cell phone call while he walked upstairs, saw Jameela’s door open and discovered her lifeless body.

Christine Malone's (left) murder is still unsolved and Cleveland police believe they have a suspect who killed Jazmine Trotter.  Skeptics wonder if Jerome Ogletree's arrest in connection with Trotter's murder seems a lot like Daniel Hines being arrested for murdering Shakira Johnson in 2003.  Hines turned out to be the wrong man and Johnson's murder remains unsolved.

Christine Malone’s (left) murder is still unsolved and Cleveland police believe they have a suspect who killed Jazmine Trotter. Skeptics wonder if Jerome Ogletree’s arrest in connection with Trotter’s murder seems a lot like Daniel Hines being arrested for murdering Shakira Johnson in 2003. Hines turned out to be the wrong man and Johnson’s murder remains unsolved after 10 years.

Hasan said Jameela’s boyfriend, Mike, said her daughter was nervous about a meeting she had planned with landlord Paul Smith and wanted his presence.  Mike was bus bound and couldn’t easily get to her, so he missed the meeting.  Records on file with Cleveland Municipal Court show Smith had filed to evict Jameela five days before she was found murdered.

Hasan doesn’t know much about Mike other than his telling her that he may have been one of the last people to speak with Jameela before she was murdered.  Jameela told her mother that she and Mike were married, but Ayesha didn’t believe her.  Her daughter, she said, had a tendency towards exaggeration.  Hasan and Mike have not met.

Hasan is like many family survivors who have lost a loved one to a homicide and whose death remains unsolved. She is tortured by a never-ending stream of questions.  One question with two parts is the one she’s not sure will ever be answered.  Who murdered her daughter and why?

Hasan is among a growing number of people who believe Mayor Frank Jackson and mayors in other cities should order police to release the records of unsolved murder victims to let the public help solve the crimes.  Cleveland homicide detectives have only spoken to her once and she doesn’t really believe they’re investigating.

Ward 2 Cleveland Councilman Zachary Reed thinks Mayor Frank Jackson should open the unsolved murder files in the city's police department so the public can help them identify potential suspects.

Ward 2 Cleveland Councilman Zachary Reed thinks Mayor Frank Jackson should open the unsolved murder files in the city’s police department so the public can help them identify potential suspects.

Since 2009 Cleveland’s homicide clearance rate has declined from 79 percent to 69 percent in 2012.  100 people were killed in Cleveland last year.  Cops believe 97 were intentional.  This means 31 percent of people murdered in 2012 were not connected to a killer.  That’s 30 unsolved murders in just one year.

“I don’t believe it hurts anything,” Hasan answered when asked if she thought her daughter and other unsolved victim’s files should be opened.

Reed also thinks Cleveland and other unsolved homicide files should be released to the public.  As justification he points to Attorney General Mike DeWine’s March 5 decision to open records of his investigation of the cops who shot and killed Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams in East Cleveland.

“We can do no less in order to help the families get the justice they deserve,” Reed said.

Hasan said Jameela was cremated last year.  The pain of her slaying was so traumatic Ayesha said she couldn’t personally identify the body.  She chose to hear a description instead.  It was the description of her daughter’s tattoo that helped confirm Jameela’s identity.

Hasan said she didn’t want her daughter’s 18-year-old son and other family members to see the results of a brutal murderer’s knife on Jameela’s tiny 104 pound body.  Jameela’s son, she said, is severely depressed.  Another daughter, Jameela’s sister, continues to question if they were sure the body found in Jameela’s apartment was actually her.  The lack of communication from Cleveland homicide detectives only worsens the pain of not knowing.

“I feel extremely helpless and I have not grieved,” Hasan said.  “I can’t trust what we’re hearing or being told and all we have is questions.  We’re walking into this brick wall with the police and getting no answers.  I don’t even know the neighbor’s name who found her.”

Anyone with information about Jameela Hasan’s murder should contact Cleveland police at 216-623-5464.  As a back up send Cleveland Challenger an email at [email protected] and this newspaper will make sure cops and the public are informed.

Source: By ERIC JONATHAN BREWER

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